THAT'S WHAT I THOUGHT. IS A BLOG BY STEVEN SANDE WHO IS BASED OUT OF GUELPH, CANADA. His goal in writing is simply to develop personally and professionally and therefore the theme of his posts can vary greatly.

Videos: Ocean Edition

Videos: Ocean Edition

Dead whales that sink down to the seafloor provide a feast for deep-sea animals that can last for years. Previous research suggested that such "whale falls" were homes for unique animals that lived nowhere else.
"Slow" marine animals show their secret life under high magnification. Corals and sponges build coral reefs and play crucial roles in the biosphere, yet we know almost nothing about their daily lives. These animals are actually very mobile creatures. However their motion is only detectable at different time scales compared to ours and requires time lapses to be seen. www.bioqueststudios.com.au Make sure you watch the video on a large screen. This clip is displayed in Full HD, yet the source footage (or the whole clip), is available in UltraHD 4k resolution for media productions. The answer to a common question: yes, colors are "real" and not exaggerated by digital enhancement. We have only applied basic white balance correction. However, we used specialized lights to mimic the underwater ambient spectrum. When photographers use white light (artificial spectrum) on corals, they simply miss the vast majority of colours. Corals have spectrum-sensitive colouration due to fluorescent pigments. The duration of sequences varied from 20 minutes to 6+ hours. === Technical details === To make this little clip we took 150000 shots. Why so many? Because macro photography involves shallow depth of field. To extend it, we used focus stacking and deconvolution algorithms. Each frame of the video is actually a stack that consists of 3-12 shots. Just the intro and the last scene are regular real-time footage. One frame required about 10 minutes of processing time (raw conversion + stacking + deconvolution in some scenes). Unfortunately, the success rate was very low due to copious technical challenges and we spent almost 9 long months to get it right. Music: Atmostra III by Cedric Baravaglio, Jonathan Ochmann and Zdravko Djordjevic. === Sharing/Use === Inquiries/licensing/press: find our contact details http://bioqueststudios.com.au/ More information about using our videos: http://bioqueststudios.com.au/image-and-video-use/ Please support the Great Barrier Reef conservation efforts http://www.marineconservation.org.au/pages/donate.html
World's Weirdest: Freaks in the Ocean : SUN OCT 14 at 3P et/pt : http://animals.nationalgeographic.com/animals Comb jellies look anything but dangerous. But those pretty, flashing lights can mean death for unwary prey. National Geographic Jellyfish Photos http://ocean.nationalgeographic.com/ocean/photos/ocean-jellyfish/
Despite a new, potent injectable to help divers kill record numbers of Crown of Thorns Starfish, the plague continues to eat huge swathes of the Great Barrier Reef down to white skeletons. Reporter Anja Taylor visits some QLD scientists working on creative ways of controlling their numbers, from robot starfish terminators to the terrifying smell of giant underwater snails.
Mantis Shrimp have a knockout punch, delivering a killer blow as fast as a 22-caliber bullet. From: SPEED KILLS http://bit.ly/1o10Zgp
Conservation Bias and the American Eel

Conservation Bias and the American Eel

Diary of a Job Seeker

Diary of a Job Seeker

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